L. L. Fine – The Space I Write In

Liron Fine

L. L. Fine is an author (check out his Amazon profile), scriptwriter and partner in a startup company. He lives in Modi’in, Israel and subsidizes his beloved family. (Photo taken by Bella Fine)

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1. The Space

My study is situated in the smallest room of the smallest apartment in the (almost) smallest building in the (almost) smallest city in Israel. It’s cluttered and windowless, but a huge fan injects turbulent wind into it from the doorway and the garden beside it. I never lock the door; it’s the only aperture in the room.

 

2. Writing Schedule

My best writing hours are at night, but night-writing doesn’t work with family life so I’ve established daytime writing habits. My day is divided as follows: at 8 a.m. I send my kids to school and then I work until they return around noon. Then it’s time for my siesta – yay! At 4 p.m. I get up and write some more until 6-7 p.m. On rare occasions I add another writing session at night.

 

3. Work Screen

It’s nice and big. I use it during 70% of the time when working on my clients’ professional projects and on my new book.

 

4. Fun Screen

Not as nice and not as big. It tends to disturb the work screen, but I accept it with love. I usually write with Facebook open, it makes me feel like I have an audience.

 

5. Cellphone Earphones

Because sometime I have to talk on the phone… I also use them when I need to separate myself from the family noises coming from outside the room.

 

6. Backup Computer

As a matter of fact it’s one of my three backup computers. Incidentally this one is a Mac. It defends my materials against viruses that have amorous feelings for windows. Sometimes I write on it too, but not in my study – in my garden. Anyway, I find it more comfortable to type on an ergonomic keyboard and look at a big screen.

 

7. Microsoft Ergonomic Keyboard

It’s a must. It enables one to type very comfortably and provides me with a great advertising contract with Microsoft, they’ve just forgotten to pay me for the last decade or so…

 

8. Bills

To remind me why I work.

 

9. A Cup of Strong Black Coffee

The second out of the four cups I drink every day.

 

10. Music

I usually write with meditation music in the background. Lately I’ve discovered Native American music.

 

11. All the Rest is Junk

Or that it’s so important that there’s no point in stashing it away in a drawer. When I write I concentrate and the physical world disappears, so the junk doesn’t bother me. And when I’m not writing? Well, it doesn’t bother me then either seeing as I’m not writing…

Inbal Ganor – The Space I Write In

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Inbal Ganor is a screenplay writer and editor. She did her Bachelors and Masters at the Tel Aviv University’s Film and Television Department, where she went on to teach screenplay writing. Inbal lives and writes in Tel Aviv.

Capture1. Cafés

At home I get up, walk back and forth, open the fridge door, look inside, close the fridge door. In a café I am bolted to my seat in a representable and obedient way, ashamed to even go on Facebook. The people around me, the motion, the buzz – bring back my inner serenity; I am part of the human brotherhood, everything is ok.

I tend to choose cafés in which it’s ok to sit for hours, very unpopular cafés and if possible a little musty.

There’s no heat wave outside, I’m not in a busy Tel Aviv street, Virginia Woolf and Sylvia Plath are sitting at the table next to mine, with their laptops open, sipping double espressos.

2. Books

Anything that can give me inspiration, throw me into a different world, a different time, into someone else’s existence and experiences. During writing periods I find I prefer reading non-fiction: sociology, psychiatry, religion, holocaust, psychology, holocaust and psychology. And more.

3. Music

I like having a soundtrack accompanying me and influencing my mood, the characters’ mood and the atmosphere as a whole. The disadvantage of this is that sometimes when I finish what I was working on, I can’t listen to that music ever again.

4. iPhone Notes

If ideas, fragments, dreams I dreamt, or maybe a story someone told me that affected me in some way pop into my mind – I quickly write them down in shorthand on an iPhone note. Sometimes I even manage to make the connection between what I wrote and whatever the hell it was I was thinking at the time.

5. The Lives of Others

Thankfully, most of the people around me are interesting characters with interesting points of view, and there’s nothing I love more than hearing people tell about their everyday dramas and the dramas of the people in their lives. If they’re funny, it’s even better.

6. Wisława Szymborska

This poster I once made (instead of working) at a workplace I no longer work at, goes with me wherever I move. Her presence, her naughty gaze and defiant cigarette, make me feel good. People who carry themselves gracefully and not too gravely, make me happy. Even if I don’t get to meet them personally. And I haven’t even said a word about her writing (who am I, what am I).

Rotem Malenky – The Space I Write In

 

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Rotem is a writer, video director, cameraman and editor. He has been writing since he was 11 and gradually moved from writing short horror stories to radical poems, documentary and fiction scripts and recently blogging. He believes you can fly.

WritingSpace#

1. Movie Posters
It’s important to surround yourself with inspirational images, even if you don’t write for cinema. Your book’s readers are mostly people who are interested in colour, design, shape and form. How many posters can you recognize in this pic?

2. To Do List
Just one of the many tools I use in a desperate attempt to be more efficient.

3. To Do Pile
The obese, 3D brother of the To Do List.

4.  A Good Chair
More important than one may think. Get yourself one today and don’t compromise, or your bad chair will send you off and away many times a day, without you realizing why.

5. The Good Screen
This is where I write, read, fill in my schedule, back up and get down (to business).

6. The Bad Screen
Satan’s own. This is where my time goes to waste. I need it for video editing though.

7. Me
As a 4 year old. This is also a very inspirational image for me. Sometimes I look at this boy’s eyes and try to guess what he would say and do in the scene that I’m writing.

8. A Fax Machine
Yeah, I have one.

Ella rose Levenbach – The Space I Write In

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Ella is a frustrated writer, who published a few stories about a decade ago and has been meaning to get back to it ever since. She used to be (and will be again because she misses it dearly) a teacher of art, creative writing, project learning and social activism. Ella is also a translator & editor and the co-founder of Hubitus – a space to write in. She currently lives and works in Tel-Aviv, Israel.

 

ella

 

1. Bed.

It’s not that I don’t have a desk. I have a desk which is fully equipped and ready for use. Except for a chair. I’m missing a chair, but that’s beside the point. I was never a table and chair kind of person. As a child I would do my homework on the floor despite the gentle parental objections and educational explanations. I’d sit on the floor, cross-legged with my notebook in front of me, leaning my elbow beside it and my head on my hand. That was the most comfortable way for me to think and write. I guess it made me feel grounded.

As I grew up I became less flexible physically and more flexible mentally, so now you can find me trying to write on couches, buses, cushions, or even at tables… but mostly on my bed in various positions: upright & leaning on the wall; stretched out sideways; legs spread out straight in front of me, laptop on a heavy book on my knees, back bent forwards towards it; lying on my belly, feet dangling in the air, head held up, notebook on the floor, my hand holding a pen trying to reach it. And there are still many options to explore and discover. In my bed I feel most at home and least aware of myself, which is essential for me to be able to enter a creative mode.

 

2. Notebook\Sketchbook.

When I was younger I wanted to be an artist. I had the whole romantic dream going of being fully and totally embraced by the powers of creativity. It was wonderful, powerful and rich but gradually the intensity of this experience subsided, due to the equally strong (if not stronger) powers of self-criticism and self-doubt. I left art and writing for many years. It felt a bit like an angry divorce with many issues left unaddressed and exposed.

Lately I’ve been trying to return to the inner zones of creativity. The notebook is the arena I search in. It’s where I try to find the door to ‘the zone’, let out all the self-inflicted venom, clear my mind. I prefer sketchbooks with thick paper and no lines so I can doodle and write and just hangout on the page in different colors and textures. The notebook can’t be too fancy so that I won’t feel obligated to create something good. I like to have fun pens and pencils. They keep me curious and playful.

 

3. A Laptop Named Samantha.

My laptop and I are kind of close… I love Sam’s rhythm, the gentle clicking sounds her keyboard buttons make. Sometimes the potential sounds are enough to get me writing even when I feel I have nothing to say.

 

4. iPhone.

I use my phone to jot down thoughts on the go. Later these thoughts are used as anchors for writing session. Evernote & Notes are my preferred apps. Evernote because of the option to combine mediums, I find it easier to write when I can start with a picture; and Notes because that’s all they are, notes. There is no order in them. I often forget about them and then later return to find words I can’t imagine were written by me. It’s a puzzling and sometimes inspiring experience.

 

5. Café.

When the writing just doesn’t happen and the home brewed coffee isn’t a strong enough incentive there’s no choice but to get out of bed, get dressed and go to a café. That’s the only place where I work like a normal person, sitting on a chair with Samantha on the table in front of me and a quality macchiato beside her. It can’t be any café. It has to be comfortable, but the parameters of comfort aren’t quite clear to me. It’s more of an intuitive and spontaneous decision even though it often tends to be the same one. Some of the questions that buzz through my mind before I sit down: Are the other customers busy enough not to notice me? Does the staff seem judgmental? Will they mind if I stay long? How’s the lighting? Is there an open corner? Where can I plug Samantha in? Is it too warm in here? How many laptops can I see? Where’s the bathroom? Yes. I tend to linger.

When I finally sit down in a café and write I am very aware of myself, but I feel like a writer. I stop being me for a while and become this cool character from a story about a writer who sits in cafés and writes captivating and important stuff. Suddenly it becomes easier for the words to appear in my brain and find their way to the page without becoming too heavy and serious on the way.

 

6. Friends.

Another way to free the words in me when they really want to stay clustered inside and chained to themselves is to write beside friends. It can be one friend who is working on something too or a group of friends doing anything. As long as I’m not expected to interact it’s helpful. It takes the severity of writing out of the equation and puts me in a more nonchalant writing mode.

 

7. Books.

Oh how I love my books. Their smell, their feel, their prestige, all the words they hold inside. I have many books. Among them quite a few about creativity and writing. Their presence soothes me. The thought that they may carry a solution, even one small tip that will enable me to write. One of the books I have opened and read many times is Writing Down the Bones by Natalie Goldberg. Every now and again when I feel motivated yet completely stuck, I randomly open it and find my way into writing.

 

8. Bedside Lamp.

My yellow lamp follows me from every apartment I leave, to every apartment I move to. I have had it with me since I was a little girl.  I like reading and writing beside it even when I don’t need its light. It symbolizes the feeling of home for me, reminds me who I am in a way. It shines a light on the things I want to do for myself.

 

9. Red Reading Glasses.

They aren’t really necessary. Their number is very small and the difference in vision very slight. But they make me see more clearly on a metaphoric level. So when I find it difficult to concentrate on my writing I put them on. They help me focus.

 

10. The Walls.

In the days when I was creating more intensely, every surface was a potential page. I saw letters not only as symbols which create verbal meaning but also as visual patterns. Painting and writing belonged to the same world. They belonged to me and I belonged with them. My walls were full of secretive phrases and intimate graffiti that were actually a conversation between me and my room.

Now ‘La Linea’ is on my wall. He was situated there by Michal, my flat mate a year before I settled in. I like to have him there. I know he’s probably criticizing me and complaining about life, but he has a sense of humor and so reminds me I have one too.  I’m looking forward to a future moment in which I will feel comfortable enough with my pen or pencil to give him a visual-verbal companion. The moment is close. I can feel it in the tips of my fingers.